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Enable ASP detailed error messages in Plesk 11.5 on Win server 2000 with IIS 7

1. Disable “Custom error documents” by going to “Website Scripting and Security”.

2. Create a new text file with the name “web.config” that you save in the root of the site and put this content into it:

<configuration>
    <system.webServer>
        <httpErrors errorMode="Detailed" />
    </system.webServer>
</configuration>

3. Refresh the page and you should have the details about the asp error.

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PHP MySQL Update

The UPDATE statement is used to modify data in a table.


Update Data In a Database

The UPDATE statement is used to update existing records in a table.

Syntax

UPDATE table_name
SET column1=value, column2=value2,…
WHERE some_column=some_value

Note:Notice the WHERE clause in the UPDATE syntax. The WHERE clause specifies which record or records that should be updated. If you omit the WHERE clause, all records will be updated!

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

To get PHP to execute the statement above we must use the mysql_query() function. This function is used to send a query or command to a MySQL connection.

Example

Earlier in the tutorial we created a table named “Persons”. Here is how it looks:

FirstName LastName Age
Peter Griffin 35
Glenn Quagmire 33

The following example updates some data in the “Persons” table:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

mysql_query(“UPDATE Persons SET Age = ’36’
WHERE FirstName = ‘Peter’ AND LastName = ‘Griffin'”);

mysql_close($con);
?>

After the update, the “Persons” table will look like this:

FirstName LastName Age
Peter Griffin 36
Glenn Quagmire 33
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PHP MySQL The Where Clause

The WHERE clause is used to filter records.


The WHERE clause

The WHERE clause is used to extract only those records that fulfill a specified criterion.

Syntax

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name
WHERE column_name operator value

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

To get PHP to execute the statement above we must use the mysql_query() function. This function is used to send a query or command to a MySQL connection.

Example

The following example selects all rows from the “Persons” table where “FirstName=’Peter’:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

$result = mysql_query(“SELECT * FROM Persons
WHERE FirstName=’Peter'”);

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
{
echo $row[‘FirstName’] . ” ” . $row[‘LastName’];
echo “<br />”;
}
?>

The output of the code above will be:

Peter Griffin
________________________________________________________

PHP MySQL Order By Keyword

The ORDER BY keyword is used to sort the data in a recordset.


The ORDER BY Keyword

The ORDER BY keyword is used to sort the data in a recordset.

The ORDER BY keyword sort the records in ascending order by default.

If you want to sort the records in a descending order, you can use the DESC keyword.

Syntax

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name
ORDER BY column_name(s) ASC|DESC

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

Example

The following example selects all the data stored in the “Persons” table, and sorts the result by the “Age” column:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

$result = mysql_query(“SELECT * FROM Persons ORDER BY age”);

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
{
echo $row[‘FirstName’];
echo ” ” . $row[‘LastName’];
echo ” ” . $row[‘Age’];
echo “<br />”;
}

mysql_close($con);
?>

The output of the code above will be:

Glenn Quagmire 33
Peter Griffin 35

 


Order by Two Columns

It is also possible to order by more than one column. When ordering by more than one column, the second column is only used if the values in the first column are equal:

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name
ORDER BY column1, column2
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PHP MySQL Select

The SELECT statement is used to select data from a database.


Select Data From a Database Table

The SELECT statement is used to select data from a database.

Syntax

SELECT column_name(s)
FROM table_name

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

To get PHP to execute the statement above we must use the mysql_query() function. This function is used to send a query or command to a MySQL connection.

Example

The following example selects all the data stored in the “Persons” table (The * character selects all the data in the table):

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

$result = mysql_query(“SELECT * FROM Persons”);

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
{
echo $row[‘FirstName’] . ” ” . $row[‘LastName’];
echo “<br />”;
}

mysql_close($con);
?>

The example above stores the data returned by the mysql_query() function in the $result variable.

Next, we use the mysql_fetch_array() function to return the first row from the recordset as an array. Each call to mysql_fetch_array() returns the next row in the recordset. The while loop loops through all the records in the recordset. To print the value of each row, we use the PHP $row variable ($row[‘FirstName’] and $row[‘LastName’]).

The output of the code above will be:

Peter Griffin
Glenn Quagmire

 


Display the Result in an HTML Table

The following example selects the same data as the example above, but will display the data in an HTML table:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

$result = mysql_query(“SELECT * FROM Persons”);

echo <table border=’1′>
<
tr>
<th>Firstname</th>
<th>Lastname</th>
</tr>”;

while($row = mysql_fetch_array($result))
{
echo “<tr>”;
echo “<td>” . $row[‘FirstName’] . “</td>”;
echo “<td>” . $row[‘LastName’] . “</td>”;
echo “</tr>”;
}
echo “</table>”;

mysql_close($con);
?>

The output of the code above will be:

Firstname Lastname
Glenn Quagmire
Peter Griffin
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PHP MySQL Insert Into a Table

The INSERT INTO statement is used to insert new records in a table.


Insert Data Into a Database Table

The INSERT INTO statement is used to add new records to a database table.

Syntax

It is possible to write the INSERT INTO statement in two forms.

The first form doesn’t specify the column names where the data will be inserted, only their values:

INSERT INTO table_name
VALUES (value1, value2, value3,…)

The second form specifies both the column names and the values to be inserted:

INSERT INTO table_name (column1, column2, column3,…)
VALUES (value1, value2, value3,…)

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

To get PHP to execute the statements above we must use the mysql_query() function. This function is used to send a query or command to a MySQL connection.

Example

In the previous chapter we created a table named “Persons”, with three columns; “Firstname”, “Lastname” and “Age”. We will use the same table in this example. The following example adds two new records to the “Persons” table:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

mysql_query(“INSERT INTO Persons (FirstName, LastName, Age)
VALUES (‘Peter’, ‘Griffin’, ’35’)”);

mysql_query(“INSERT INTO Persons (FirstName, LastName, Age)
VALUES (‘Glenn’, ‘Quagmire’, ’33’)”);

mysql_close($con);
?>

 


Insert Data From a Form Into a Database

Now we will create an HTML form that can be used to add new records to the “Persons” table.

Here is the HTML form:

<html>
<body>

<form action=”insert.php” method=”post”>
Firstname: <input type=”text” name=”firstname” />
Lastname: <input type=”text” name=”lastname” />
Age: <input type=”text” name=”age” />
<input type=”submit” />
</form>

</body>
</html>

When a user clicks the submit button in the HTML form in the example above, the form data is sent to “insert.php”.

The “insert.php” file connects to a database, and retrieves the values from the form with the PHP $_POST variables.

Then, the mysql_query() function executes the INSERT INTO statement, and a new record will be added to the “Persons” table.

Here is the “insert.php” page:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);

$sql=”INSERT INTO Persons (FirstName, LastName, Age)
VALUES
(‘$_POST[firstname]’,’$_POST[lastname]’,’$_POST[age]’)”;

if (!mysql_query($sql,$con))
{
die(‘Error: ‘ . mysql_error());
}
echo “1 record added”;

mysql_close($con)
?>

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PHP MySQL Create Database and Tables

A database holds one or multiple tables.


Create a Database

The CREATE DATABASE statement is used to create a database in MySQL.

Syntax

CREATE DATABASE database_name

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

To get PHP to execute the statement above we must use the mysql_query() function. This function is used to send a query or command to a MySQL connection.

Example

The following example creates a database called “my_db”:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

if (mysql_query(“CREATE DATABASE my_db”,$con))
{
echo “Database created”;
}
else
{
echo “Error creating database: ” . mysql_error();
}

mysql_close($con);
?>

 


Create a Table

The CREATE TABLE statement is used to create a table in MySQL.

Syntax

CREATE TABLE table_name
(
column_name1 data_type,
column_name2 data_type,
column_name3 data_type,
….

)

To learn more about SQL, please visit our SQL tutorial.

We must add the CREATE TABLE statement to the mysql_query() function to execute the command.

Example

The following example creates a table named “Persons”, with three columns. The column names will be “FirstName”, “LastName” and “Age”:

<?php
$con = mysql_connect(“localhost”,”peter”,”abc123″);
if (!$con)
{
die(‘Could not connect: ‘ . mysql_error());
}

// Create database
if (mysql_query(“CREATE DATABASE my_db”,$con))
{
echo “Database created”;
}
else
{
echo “Error creating database: ” . mysql_error();
}

// Create table
mysql_select_db(“my_db”, $con);
$sql = “CREATE TABLE Persons
(
FirstName varchar(15),
LastName varchar(15),
Age int
)”;

// Execute query
mysql_query($sql,$con);

mysql_close($con);
?>

Important: A database must be selected before a table can be created. The database is selected with the mysql_select_db() function.

Note: When you create a database field of type varchar, you must specify the maximum length of the field, e.g. varchar(15).

The data type specifies what type of data the column can hold. For a complete reference of all the data types available in MySQL, go to our complete Data Types reference.


Primary Keys and Auto Increment Fields

Each table should have a primary key field.

A primary key is used to uniquely identify the rows in a table. Each primary key value must be unique within the table. Furthermore, the primary key field cannot be null because the database engine requires a value to locate the record.

The following example sets the personID field as the primary key field. The primary key field is often an ID number, and is often used with the AUTO_INCREMENT setting. AUTO_INCREMENT automatically increases the value of the field by 1 each time a new record is added. To ensure that the primary key field cannot be null, we must add the NOT NULL setting to the field.

Example

$sql = “CREATE TABLE Persons
(
personID int NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
PRIMARY KEY(personID),
FirstName varchar(15),
LastName varchar(15),
Age int
)”;

mysql_query($sql,$con);

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Windows & Ubuntu Dual Boot

Introduction

This page describes how to set up your computer in order to dual boot Ubuntu and Windows.

Back Up Your Data

Although this may seem obvious, it is important to backup your data files to an external backup medium before attempting a dual-boot install (or any other hard drive manipulation), in case your hard drive becomes corrupted during the process. External hard drives, USB flash drives, and multiple DVDs or CDs are useful as external backup media.

Have a Windows recovery CD/DVD available

Many computer manufacturers that pre-install Windows provide a Windows recovery/re-installation CD or DVD with the computer. However, many companies no longer ship a physical disk but instead create a hidden partition on the hard drive in which the recovery-disk information is stored. A utility is then usually provided which allows the user to burn a recovery/re-installation CD or DVD from it. If you are buying a new computer and intent on dual-booting, make sure you have (or can make) a physical Windows recovery/re-installation CD or DVD. If neither a CD/DVD nor a recovery partition/burning utility is provided by your computer manufacturer, you may need to telephone your vendor and ask for a CD or DVD (to which you are normally entitled under the Windows EULA).

It is very important to have such a physical recovery/re-installation CD/DVD prior to changing your hard drive, in case your hard drive becomes corrupted in the process (and the recovery partition thereby becomes unavailable for use).

Once you have created a physical backup disk from a restore-image partition on the hard-drive, the restore-image partition can either be removed or left in place. Ubuntu can be installed with it intact without problems.

Getting Recovery Media

You may need to request a physical recovery/re-installation CD or DVD directly from your computer manufacturer. Here are some resources:

Install Ubuntu after Windows

In general, a Windows OS should be installed first, because its bootloader is very particular and because Windows installers tend to overwrite the entire hard drive (potentially wiping out any other data stored on it). If Windows isn’t already installed, install it first. If you are able to partition the drive prior to installing Windows, leave space for Ubuntu during the initial partitioning process. Then you won’t have to resize your NTFS partition to make room for Ubuntu later (saving a bit of time).

When a Windows installation already occupies the entire hard drive, its partition needs to be shrunk, creating free space for the Ubuntu partition. See How to Resize Windows Partitions to learn how to do this.

This can be done through Control Panel -> Administrative tools -> Computer Management -> Disk Management. You can then use the partition manager to shrink the partitions. As a side note, you can only create free space to the right of a partition.

If you have resized the windows 7 /vista partitions and cannot boot up windows, you can use the instructions from WindowsRecovery to fix it. Once free space has been created on the hard drive, it is easy to install Ubuntu as the second operating system (and it is done automatically) from the Ubuntu LiveCD. Allow the Ubuntu LiveCD to install to “largest available free space” (if you have left unallocated free space), or manually into a partition that you have already created for Ubuntu.

Install Ubuntu

  • Download an Ubuntu LiveCD image (.iso) from Ubuntu Downloads and burn an Ubuntu LiveCD (see BurningIsoHowto).
  • Insert the LiveCD into your CD-ROM drive and reboot your PC.
  • If the computer does not boot from the CD (eg. Windows starts again instead), check your BIOS settings and adjust them so that booting from the CD is allowed.
  • Proceed with installation until you are asked this question: “How do you want to partition the disk ?”.

Resizing Partitions Using the Ubuntu Installer

Automatic partition resizing

  • Choose the First Option (It should be something like: “Resize IDE1 master, partition #1 (hda1) and use freed space”).
  • Specify the size of the new partition as a percentage of your entire hard disk.
  • Click on “Forward”.
  • Continue to Finishing Ubuntu Installation

Manual partitioning

  • Choose “Manually edit partition table”
  • Listed will be your current partitions
  • Select the partition you want to resize and press Enter.
  • Select “Size:”, press Enter.
  • Select Yes, press Enter.
  • Type in a new size in Gigabytes for your partition, it’s recommended you free up AT LEAST 10 GB of free space for your Ubuntu install. Press Enter when happy with your changes. It may take some time to apply the changes.
  • Create a swap partition of at least your amount of RAM (if you don’t know, 2000 MB is a good value).
  • Create a partition for your Ubuntu installation, at least 10 GB.
  • Select “Finish partitioning and write changes to disk”.

Master Boot Record and Boot Manager

GNU/GRUB2 is the boot manager installed in Ubuntu by default. If you use the Alternate CD you can choose Lilo instead. GRUB2, GRUB and Lilo are good Open Source boot managers so the main parts of the boot loaders are installed inside Ubuntu. This means Ubuntu is independent and avoids any need for writing to other operating systems. To accomplish this, the only thing in your computer outside of Ubuntu that needs to be changed is a small code in the MBR (Master Boot Record) of the first hard disk. The MBR code is changed to point to the boot loader in Ubuntu. You will be presented with a list of operating systems and you can choose one to boot. If you do nothing Ubuntu will boot after a ten second countdown. If you select Windows then GRUB or Lilo will chain-load Windows for you at the Windows boot sector, which is the first sector of the Windows partition.

If you have a problem with changing the MBR code, you might prefer to just install the code for pointing to GRUB to the first sector of your Ubuntu partition instead. If you do that during the Ubuntu installation process, then Ubuntu won’t boot until you configure some other boot manager to point to Ubuntu’s boot sector. Windows Vista no longer utilizes boot.ini, ntdetect.com, and ntldr when booting. Instead, Vista stores all data for its new boot manager in a boot folder. Windows Vista ships with an command line utility called bcdedit.exe, which requires administrator credentials to use. You may want to read http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=112156 about it.

Using a command line utility always has its learning curve, so a more productive and better job can be done with a free utility called EasyBCD, developed and mastered in during the times of Vista Beta already. EasyBCD is user friendly and many Vista users highly recommend EasyBCD.

Installing Windows After Ubuntu

Normally when Windows is installed after Ubuntu the “Master Boot Record”, MBR, will be overwritten. You can bootup off a LiveCD and repair the MBR. However, there are 2 different approaches:

Recovering GRUB after reinstalling Windows

There are also these help guides

Which should help with any install of Ubuntu now. For some simple cases the advice below might help

Ubuntu 10.04 or 9.10

Sorry, definitely use this guide

Ubuntu 9.10 & earlier

The older Grub, sometimes called Grub-legacy or perhaps Grub1 was used up until Ubuntu 9.10. The default for 9.10 was initially Grub1 but installs would drift over to Grub2 without users really being aware of the change. With any current Ubuntu install it is wise to install, or re-install Grub2 as shown in the link above.

If you run an older Ubuntu or had any trouble with Grub2 then Grub1 & Lilo are still available. To fix the MBR with an older LiveCD to access a Grub command-line:

  1. Boot into a LiveCD
  2. Open a terminal
  3. Open the GRUB Command-line utility by typing
sudo grub
  1. Find where Grub is. If this gives a few different answers then you will need to find the correct one, perhaps by trial-and-error.
find /boot/grub/stage1
  1. Tell GRUB which partition to tell the MBR your Grub is on by entering
root (hdA,B)

The coordinates A,B are where ‘A’ is the hard-drive number, starting at 0, and ‘B’ is the partition number, starting at 0. For example, if Ubuntu was installed on the second partition of the first hard-drive, the command should be

root (hd0,1)
  1. Tell GRUB which drive’s MBR to fix
setup (hd0)

Replace 0 only in the extremely unlikely event that your bios does not use the first hard-drive as the boot device. Typically Ubuntu might be on any drive but the bios will almost always go to the first drive’s MBR to find out where to find the boot-loader.

  1. Leave the GRUB Command line
quit

and reboot.

Master Boot Record backup and re-replacement

Back-up the existing MBR, install Windows, replace your backup overwriting the Windows boot code:

  1. Create an NTFS partition for windows (using fdisk, GPartEd or whatever tool you are familiar with)
  2. Backup the MBR e.g. dd if=/dev/sda of=/mbr.bin bs=446 count=1
  3. Install windows
  4. Boot into a LiveCD
  5. Mount your root partition in the LiveCD
  6. Restore the MBR e.g. dd if=/media/sda/mbr.bin of=/dev/sda bs=446 count=1
  7. Restart and Ubuntu will boot
  8. Setup grub to boot windows

Issues with Windows XP and NTFS

The Ubuntu installer has included support for resizing NTFS partitions since Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger) was released way back in 2005. Very few problems have been reported relative to the huge number of times that the installer has been used. If you tried the above procedure and have had no luck, it might be that there is a pre-existing problem either in the file system, in the partition table or the hard disk.

First you should try running CHKDSK before trying again to resize the partition, and if you are using the Alternate CD, defragging might help. It is recommended that you run CHKDSK once again after resizing your NTFS partition.

Also, try the following alternative methods:

Using QtParted from the System Rescue CD

  1. Boot into Windows and backup any valuable documents/photos etc onto removable media such as CD-R/DVD-R.
  2. Run the Windows disk check tool (Error-checking) on C: a couple of times (the results can be seen in the Administrative Tools > Event Viewer > Application under a “Winlogon” entry).
  3. Run the Windows defragmentation tool on C:
  4. Download the System Rescue CD ISO image (100 MB; has several very useful software tools).
  5. Burn the ISO image to a CD.
  6. Boot from the CD and hit Enter when you see the message “Boot:”.
  7. When you get a command prompt, enter:
run_qtparted
  1. Select your disk on the graphical screen (most likely /dev/hda).
  2. Select your NTFS partition to be resized (most likely /dev/hda1).
  3. Right click with the mouse and choose Resize.
  4. Set the new partition size.
  5. Commit your changes in the File -> Commit menu. If your keyboard and mouse stop responding during resizing then please just be patient.
  6. Once your changes are saved, remove the System Rescue CD and insert your Ubuntu installation CD.
  7. Reboot and install Ubuntu into the free space.

Using GParted from UNetbootin-PartedMagic

Another approach to resizing partitions, which does not require a CD, is to load PartedMagic

from Windows via the UNetbootin PartedMagic Loader:

  1. Download and install the Windows (.exe) file, then reboot.
  2. Select the UNetbootin-partedmagic entry after rebooting, and wait as PartedMagic boots up.
  3. Start the partition manager by clicking the GParted icon on the the panel.
  4. Select your disk (probably /dev/sda) via the drop-down menu on the top-right corner of the interface.
  5. Right-click the NTFS partition to be resized (probably /dev/sda1), and select the “resize” option.
  6. Drag the slider to specify the new size the NTFS partition should be resized to, then press OK.
  7. Press the “Apply” button to resize the disk, then reboot once done.
  8. Upon the next Windows boot, click OK when prompted to remove UNetbootin-partedmagic to remove its boot menu entry.

Also see

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How to Create Bootable USB Drive to Install Windows Vista?

This tutorial will help you in creating a bootable USB drive of Windows Vista which you can use to install Vista in any system. It might become very useful when you don’t have access to DVD drive. The USB Drive can be either a Flash Stick or an external HDD Drive.

1. First format your USB drive in NTFS file system. You can do it by attaching your USB drive to your system and then format it from My Computer window.

2. Now open Command Prompt window from Start menu. Right-click on Command Prompt entry in start menu and select “Run as administrator” option.

3. Now type diskpart in Command Prompt window and press Enter. It’ll launch DiskPart program:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v374/vishaal_here/LaunchDiskpart.jpg

4. Now provide following command:

list volume

It’ll show a list of all drives in your system. Look for your USB drive entry. As in the below screenshot, the USB drive is “G” which you can determine from its “Type” entry.

Now you have to select the USB drive volume by providing select volume no. command. Since in our case volume no. of USB drive is “Volume 4”, the command would be:

select volume 4

Now we have to make this drive active. So provide active command:

active

Now exit from DiskPart using exit command.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v374/vishaal_here/UsingDiskpart.jpg

5. Now we need to create Boot sector on USB drive. We’ll use “bootsect.exe” utility for this task. You can find this utility in Windows Vista setup disk. It’ll be present in “Boot” directory.

Now provide following command in Command Prompt:

bootsect /nt60 G:

Here G is drive letter of USB drive. Replace it with the correct drive letter if your system has some other letter for USB drive.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v374/vishaal_here/InstallingBootloaderonUSB.jpg

6. At last, copy all files/folders from Vista Setup DVD to your USB drive and you have done.

Now you can boot using your USB drive and can install Windows Vista in any system.